Posts

Featured Post

European and State Governments Squeezing Businesses for tax Dollars!

European governments are attacking American businesses trying to get as much tax money as possible. The latest leader in this witchhunt is France. They are not only going after companies for large civil taxes but they are at going after the businesses and the employees of the business for criminal penalties and possibly jail. Leading the list are Google, McDonald's and Bookings.com. All these companies have some relationship to France by having services sold through subsidiaries, but the French do not care about legal structures of business. They just want their tax!

This sounds a lot like many State governments. New Jersey is always trying to find "nexus" to pull in out-of-state businesses as being subject to New Jersey taxes. Also any business located in New Jersey is subject to grueling sales and use tax audits and lengthy appeals and court hearings. It is a real problem particularly when the company tries to handle it themselves or have an accountant represent them i…

Your 2017 tax return may be your last chance to take the “manufacturers’ deduction”

Image
Your 2017 tax return may be your last chance to take the “manufacturers’ deduction”
While many provisions of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) will save businesses tax, the new law also reduces or eliminates some tax breaks for businesses. One break it eliminates is the Section 199 deduction, commonly referred to as the “manufacturers’ deduction.” When it’s available, this potentially valuable tax break can be claimed by many types of businesses beyond just manufacturing companies. Under the TCJA, 2017 is the last tax year noncorporate taxpayers can take the deduction (2018 for C corporation taxpayers).

The basics
The Sec. 199 deduction, also called the “domestic production activities deduction,” is 9% of the lesser of qualified production activities income or taxable income. The deduction is also limited to 50% of W-2 wages paid by the taxpayer that are allocable to domestic production gross receipts (DPGR).

Yes, the deduction is available to traditional manufacturers. But businesses …

Bid to collect internet sales tax gets U.S. Supreme Court review | Tax Pro Today

Bid to collect internet sales tax gets U.S. Supreme Court review | Tax Pro Today



It is easy to go after US-based businesses, even the small companies that remain in business trying to comply with the 8,000 different Sales Tax collection rates and jurisdictions. So, yes, the States will collect some money from Large US businesses and drive small internet companies bankrupt. But how will they collect from the Chinese sellers? Or, some of the sellers from a myriad of countries. Let's face it, this will be a disaster for US consumers giving us less choice, higher prices, and will force many good internet businesses to close.



Way to go!

New tax law gives pass-through businesses a valuable deduction

Image
New tax law gives pass-through businesses a valuable deduction Although the drop of the corporate tax rate from a top rate of 35% to a flat rate of 21% may be one of the most talked about provisions of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA), C corporations aren’t the only type of entity significantly benefiting from the new law. Owners of noncorporate “pass-through” entities may see some major — albeit temporary — relief in the form of a new deduction for a portion of qualified business income (QBI).

A 20% deduction
For tax years beginning after December 31, 2017, and before January 1, 2026, the new deduction is available to individuals, estates and trusts that own interests in pass-through business entities. Such entities include sole proprietorships, partnerships, S corporations and, typically, limited liability companies (LLCs). The deduction generally equals 20% of QBI, subject to restrictions that can apply if taxable income exceeds the applicable threshold — $157,500 or, if married fi…

Bonus Depreciation under the new Tax Law can affect 2017 return

Image
The TCJA temporarily expands bonus depreciation
The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) enhances some tax breaks for businesses while reducing or eliminating others. One break it enhances — temporarily — is bonus depreciation. While most TCJA provisions go into effect for the 2018 tax year, you might be able to benefit from the bonus depreciation enhancements when you file your 2017 tax return.

Pre-TCJA bonus depreciation
Under pre-TCJA law, for qualified new assets that your business placed in service in 2017, you can claim a 50% first-year bonus depreciation deduction. Used assets don’t qualify. This tax break is available for the cost of new computer systems, purchased software, vehicles, machinery, equipment, office furniture, etc.

In addition, 50% bonus depreciation can be claimed for qualified improvement property, which means any qualified improvement to the interior portion of a nonresidential building if the improvement is placed in service after the date the building is placed in s…

Business Tax Law Changes - letter to Clients

Business Tax Law Changes

The following is my client letter addressing the Business Tax Law Changes in the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017:

On December 22, the President signed into law the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 (TCJA). The 503-page TCJA is the largest tax overhaul since the 1986 Tax Reform Act and it will affect almost every individual and business in the United States. Unlike the provisions for individuals, which generally expire after 2025, the business-related provisions in the TCJA are permanent and generally take effect in tax years beginning after 2017.

For businesses, highlights of the TCJA include: (1) an increase in amounts that may be expensed under bonus depreciation and Section 179; (2) a 21 percent flat corporate tax rate; (3) a new business deduction for sole proprietorships and pass-through entities; and (4) the elimination of the corporate alternative minimum tax (AMT).

Overview of TCJA Changes Affecting Businesses

The following is a summary of some of the more sign…

Tax Cuts and Jobs Act: Key provisions a ffecting Businesses

Image
Tax Cuts and Jobs Act: Key provisions affecting businesses The recently passed tax reform bill, commonly referred to as the “Tax Cuts and Jobs Act” (TCJA), is the most expansive federal tax legislation since 1986. It includes a multitude of provisions that will have a major impact on businesses.
Here’s a look at some of the most significant changes. They generally apply to tax years beginning after December 31, 2017, except where noted.
Replacement of graduated corporate tax rates ranging from 15% to 35% with a flat corporate rate of 21%Repeal of the 20% corporate alternative minimum tax (AMT)New 20% qualified business income deduction for owners of flow-through entities (such as partnerships, limited liability companies and S corporations) and sole proprietorships — through 2025Doubling of bonus depreciation to 100% and expansion of qualified assets to include used assets — effective for assets acquired and placed in service after September 27, 2017, and before January 1, 2023Doublin…

Tax Reform Summary and action Plan for the last weeks of 2017

This is my client letter addressing Tax Reform:

Dear Client:

Congress is enacting the biggest tax reform law in thirty years, one that will make fundamental changes in the way you, your family and your business calculate your federal income tax bill, and the amount of federal tax you will pay. Since most of the changes will go into effect next year, there's still a narrow window of time before year-end to soften or avoid the impact of crackdowns and to best position yourself for the tax breaks that may be heading your way. Here's a quick rundown of last-minute moves you should think about making.
Lower tax rates coming. The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act will reduce tax rates for many taxpayers, effective for the 2018 tax year. Additionally, many businesses, including those operated as passthroughs, such as partnerships, may see their tax bills cut.
The general plan of action to take advantage of lower tax rates next year is to defer income into next year. Some possibilities follow:


If y…