Showing posts from January, 2018

Meals, entertainment and transportation may cost businesses more under the TCJA

Meals, entertainment and transportation may cost businesses more under the TCJA

Along with tax rate reductions and a new deduction for pass-through qualified business income, the new tax law brings the reduction or elimination of tax deductions for certain business expenses. Two expense areas where the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) changes the rules — and not to businesses’ benefit — are meals/entertainment and transportation. In effect, the reduced tax benefits will mean these expenses are more costly to a business’s bottom line.

Meals and entertainment
Prior to the TCJA, taxpayers generally could deduct 50% of expenses for business-related meals and entertainment. Meals provided to an employee for the convenience of the employer on the employer’s business premises were 100% deductible by the employer and tax-free to the recipient employee.
Under the new law, for amounts paid or incurred after December 31, 2017, deductions for business-related entertainment expenses are disallowed.


January 29, 2018 is the First Day for Filing 2017 1040's


Interesting Items for Recent Tax Reform and Cases

Client Letter concerning the Latest Tax Reforms and Developments to Individuals

The following is a summary of important tax developments that have occurred in the past three months that may affect you, your family, your investments, and your livelihood. Please call me at 856-665-2121 for more information about any of these developments and what steps you should implement to take advantage of favorable developments and to minimize the impact of those that are unfavorable.

Major Tax Reform. On December 22, President Trump signed into law the "Tax Cuts and Jobs Act" (P.L. 115-97), a sweeping tax reform law that will entirely change the tax landscape. Even though this is being referred to by politicians, the news media, and so-called opinion leaders as tax reform is really not reform. It is change. It is not a simplification of our tax system and in fact make some things more complex. Even though this will have a dramatic impact on most taxpayers, it is not the comprehensive tax…

Your 2017 tax return may be your last chance to take the “manufacturers’ deduction”

Your 2017 tax return may be your last chance to take the “manufacturers’ deduction”
While many provisions of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) will save businesses tax, the new law also reduces or eliminates some tax breaks for businesses. One break it eliminates is the Section 199 deduction, commonly referred to as the “manufacturers’ deduction.” When it’s available, this potentially valuable tax break can be claimed by many types of businesses beyond just manufacturing companies. Under the TCJA, 2017 is the last tax year noncorporate taxpayers can take the deduction (2018 for C corporation taxpayers).

The basics
The Sec. 199 deduction, also called the “domestic production activities deduction,” is 9% of the lesser of qualified production activities income or taxable income. The deduction is also limited to 50% of W-2 wages paid by the taxpayer that are allocable to domestic production gross receipts (DPGR).

Yes, the deduction is available to traditional manufacturers. But businesses …

Bid to collect internet sales tax gets U.S. Supreme Court review | Tax Pro Today

Bid to collect internet sales tax gets U.S. Supreme Court review | Tax Pro Today

It is easy to go after US-based businesses, even the small companies that remain in business trying to comply with the 8,000 different Sales Tax collection rates and jurisdictions. So, yes, the States will collect some money from Large US businesses and drive small internet companies bankrupt. But how will they collect from the Chinese sellers? Or, some of the sellers from a myriad of countries. Let's face it, this will be a disaster for US consumers giving us less choice, higher prices, and will force many good internet businesses to close.

Way to go!

New tax law gives pass-through businesses a valuable deduction

New tax law gives pass-through businesses a valuable deduction Although the drop of the corporate tax rate from a top rate of 35% to a flat rate of 21% may be one of the most talked about provisions of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA), C corporations aren’t the only type of entity significantly benefiting from the new law. Owners of noncorporate “pass-through” entities may see some major — albeit temporary — relief in the form of a new deduction for a portion of qualified business income (QBI).

A 20% deduction
For tax years beginning after December 31, 2017, and before January 1, 2026, the new deduction is available to individuals, estates and trusts that own interests in pass-through business entities. Such entities include sole proprietorships, partnerships, S corporations and, typically, limited liability companies (LLCs). The deduction generally equals 20% of QBI, subject to restrictions that can apply if taxable income exceeds the applicable threshold — $157,500 or, if married fi…

Bonus Depreciation under the new Tax Law can affect 2017 return

The TCJA temporarily expands bonus depreciation
The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) enhances some tax breaks for businesses while reducing or eliminating others. One break it enhances — temporarily — is bonus depreciation. While most TCJA provisions go into effect for the 2018 tax year, you might be able to benefit from the bonus depreciation enhancements when you file your 2017 tax return.

Pre-TCJA bonus depreciation
Under pre-TCJA law, for qualified new assets that your business placed in service in 2017, you can claim a 50% first-year bonus depreciation deduction. Used assets don’t qualify. This tax break is available for the cost of new computer systems, purchased software, vehicles, machinery, equipment, office furniture, etc.

In addition, 50% bonus depreciation can be claimed for qualified improvement property, which means any qualified improvement to the interior portion of a nonresidential building if the improvement is placed in service after the date the building is placed in s…